Welcome to our weekly roundup of the top five Amazon news stories of the week.

Amazon could soon force you to go on a diet, according to one futurist: Katharine Schwab at Fast Company reports that in 2029, there’s a good chance you’ll be living in a Google, an Amazon, or an Apple home–you and all of your data, biometric and otherwise. Adding smart devices to your house may have started as a way to make your life and your energy use a little more efficient. But 10 years from now, it may blossom into a full-scale operating system that has automated your life in ways you don’t fully understand. Continue reading…

Amazon Pay inks Worldpay integration as it branches out in the wider world of ecommerce: Ingrid Lunden at TechCrunch reports that Amazon has inked a deal with Worldpay for the latter to become its first acquirer. This means that Worldpay — one of the more ubiquitous providers of payment technologies, processing 40 billion transactions worth some $1.7 trillion annually through 300+ payment options and 120 currencies — will now be offering Amazon Pay as part of that mix, so that any merchant can offer this as a payment and shipping option to its customers. Continue reading…

Amazon’s cheapest Kindle now has a better screen and a front light: Samuel Gibbs at The Guardian reports that Amazon has released a new version of its cheapest Kindle e-reader with an improved screen and a reading light, a feature previously held back for its more expensive devices. Costing £10 more than the previous generation, at £69.99, the new Kindle has a 6in e-ink display with an adjustable front light that projects from the sides to make the screen readable in the dark. Continue reading…

Amazon is aggressively blocking ads for unprofitable products as part of a plan to bolster its bottom line: Eugene Kim at CNBC reports that as Amazon steps up its effort to show Wall Street it can generate profits, the ecommerce giant is aggressively blocking money-losing products from advertising on its site. In recent months, Amazon has been telling more vendors, or brand owners who sell their goods wholesale, that if Amazon can’t sell those products to consumers at a profit, it won’t let them pay to promote the items. For example, if a $5 water bottle costs Amazon that amount to store, pack and ship, the maker of the water bottle won’t be allowed to advertise it. Continue reading…

Amazon creates its own skincare line called Belei: Jon Fingas at Engadget reports that Amazon has introduced its first “dedicated” skincare line, Belei, to snap up customers who’d otherwise hunt down coveted Korean products. The initial catalogue includes everything from basics like facial wipes ($9) to a slew of moisturizers (typically $35) and multi-purpose serums (up to $40), helping you deal with everything from acne to wrinkles. Notably, Amazon’s own name is conspicuously absent — it clearly doesn’t want to you to associate your eye cream too closely with the company that made your Echo speaker. Continue reading…

Quote of the week:
“The reason it seems that price is all your customers care about is that you haven’t given them anything else to care about.”
Seth Godin

Have a great weekend!

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